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Arthritis and depression often
occur together in older adults

Arthritis is common in individuals with varying degrees of depression, according to a new International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry study. In the analysis of National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2011-2014 data on US adults aged 50 years and older, the prevalence of arthritis was 55.0%, 62.9%, and 67.8% in participants with minor, moderate, and severe depression, respectively.

The findings highlight the importance of screening for and treating arthritis-related pain in older adults with depressive symptoms. In addition, understanding that depressive symptoms and arthritis may be interlinked in older adults is critical to ensure availability and access to appropriate care.


Research examines mechanisms behind
cognitive decline
in Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes has been linked with an increased risk of cognitive dysfunction and dementia, but the underlying mechanisms are uncertain. In a new Diabetic Medicine study, imaging tests revealed that changes in white matter regions of the brain that are indicative of small vessel disease are associated with decreased processing speed (the time it takes a person to do a mental task) in people with Type 2 diabetes. Also, higher blood pressure and worse kidney function were related to worse cognition.

The findings suggest that blood vessels in the brain may be involved in the mechanisms that lead to cognitive decline in individuals with Type 2 diabetes. Cognitive dysfunction is an emerging target of complications of diabetes mellitus, and we believe that our results provide some clue into the mechanisms behind its development, said lead author Dr. Boris Mankovsky, of the National Medical Academy for Postgraduate Education, in Kiev, Ukraine.


 Overweight & obesity linked to higher risk
of urinary incontinence for women

Being overweight or obese is linked with an increased risk of developing urinary incontinence for young to mid-aged women, according to an Obesity Reviews analysis of all relevant published studies. When compared with ˜normal body mass index, overweight was associated with a one-third increase in risk of urinary incontinence, while the risk was doubled in women with obesity.

The findings indicate that clinical advice to young women who are obese or at risk of becoming obese should not be limited to metabolic health, but should also emphasize the role of excess weight on pelvic floor weakening and subsequent risk of incontinence.

We know that urinary incontinence can be a complex issue, especially among younger women, said lead author Tayla Lamerton, of The University of Queensland, in Australia. Understanding overweight and obesity as a determinant of urinary incontinence could play a role in the way we counsel those affected by the condition, and our findings provide a building block to further explore lifestyle interventions for preventing and managing incontinence.

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